Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

The Primacy of Politics: Comparing the Foreign Policies of Cuba and Mexico

Jorge I. Domínguez and Juan Lindau
International Political Science Review / Revue internationale de science politique
Vol. 5, No. 1, Foreign Policy Decisions in the Third World (1984), pp. 75-101
Published by: Sage Publications, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1600959
Page Count: 27
  • Get Access
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($40.00)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
The Primacy of Politics: Comparing the Foreign Policies of Cuba and Mexico
Preview not available

Abstract

Before embarking on an analysis of decisions, this article sets out three structural constraints that condition Latin America's foreign policies: (a) the persisting hierarchy of the international system; (b) the countries' low degree of industrialization; and (c) the high centralization of political decision-making The article then sees how these elements are manifested in Cuba's decisions to deploy her forces in Africa (i.e., a great power's policy by a small power), and Mexico's decision to conduct an active policy in Central America. This comparative analysis leads to two general conclusions: (a) the primacy of the presidential center, especially in the field of high politics; and (b) the more centralized and authoritarian the political system, the less likely that foreign policy decisions need satisfy internal political demands. Moreover, the analysis of these decisions indicates an additional but more specific conclusion: the marginality or even absence of economic gains; on the contrary, both countries were ready to incur economic costs. /// Avant d'entreprendre une analyse de décisions, cette étude présente trois contraintes structurelles conditionnant la politique étrangère des pays latino-américains: a) l'hiérarchie existante du système international, b) le faible niveau d'industrialisation parmi les pays latino-américains, et c) le degré élevé de centralisation au niveau de prise de décision. L'étude applique ces éléments aux décisions de Cuba d'intervenir militairement en Afrique (soit la poursuite d'une politique de grande puissance par une petite puissance) et la décision du Mexique d'adopter une politique étrangère active en Amérique centrale. Cette analyse comparative aboutit à deux conclusions générales: a) la primauté du centre décisionnel, surtout en haute politique; b) avec la centralisation croissante des systèmes politiques du Tiers Monde, leurs décisions en politique étrangère sont trés peu influencées par les revendications politiques internes. En outre, l'analyse de ces décisions indique une troisième conclusion plus spécifique: le rôle marginal, sinon inexistant des objectifs économiques; au contraire Cuba et le Mexique étaient prêts à encourir des coûts économiques pour atteindre leurs objectifs politiques.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
75
    75
  • Thumbnail: Page 
76
    76
  • Thumbnail: Page 
77
    77
  • Thumbnail: Page 
78
    78
  • Thumbnail: Page 
79
    79
  • Thumbnail: Page 
80
    80
  • Thumbnail: Page 
81
    81
  • Thumbnail: Page 
82
    82
  • Thumbnail: Page 
83
    83
  • Thumbnail: Page 
84
    84
  • Thumbnail: Page 
85
    85
  • Thumbnail: Page 
86
    86
  • Thumbnail: Page 
87
    87
  • Thumbnail: Page 
88
    88
  • Thumbnail: Page 
89
    89
  • Thumbnail: Page 
90
    90
  • Thumbnail: Page 
91
    91
  • Thumbnail: Page 
92
    92
  • Thumbnail: Page 
93
    93
  • Thumbnail: Page 
94
    94
  • Thumbnail: Page 
95
    95
  • Thumbnail: Page 
96
    96
  • Thumbnail: Page 
97
    97
  • Thumbnail: Page 
98
    98
  • Thumbnail: Page 
99
    99
  • Thumbnail: Page 
100
    100
  • Thumbnail: Page 
101
    101