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Recent Trends of the Nation-State in Contemporary Latin America

Marcos Kaplan
International Political Science Review / Revue internationale de science politique
Vol. 6, No. 1, The Future of the State (1985), pp. 81-103
Published by: Sage Publications, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1600971
Page Count: 23
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Recent Trends of the Nation-State in Contemporary Latin America
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Abstract

The nation-state in contemporary Latin America has increasingly tended to its growth, autonomization, and supremacy as an apparatus, an institution, an embodiment of public élites, and as the main agency of the structure, operation, and development of national societies. This process has coexisted recently with a crisis of the state threatening its autonomy and capacity. The causes, characteristics, and consequences of the state's ascent, its interventionism and autonomization, and its limits and crises are analyzed. The weight of historical heritage, the contemporary factors and processes, both international and internal, and their interactions are considered. The hypothesis is advanced that the crisis of the nation-state does not exclude, and on the contrary reinforces, the possibility of its continuity and increased interventionism and autonomization under a variety of political types and forms. /// L'État-nation dans l'Amérique latine contemporaine tend de plus en plus à sa croissance, son autonomisation et sa suprématie, en tant qu'appareil, en tant qu'institution, en tant qu'incarnation des élites publiques, et en tant que principale agence de la structuration, de l'operation et du développement des sociétés nationales. Ce processus a récemment été accompagné d'une crise de l'État menaçant son autonomie et son pouvoir. Les causes, les caractéristiques et les conséquences de la montée de l'État, de son interventionisme et de son autonomisation, de ses limites et crises sont analysées. Le poids de l'heritage historique, des facteurs et des processus contemporains, internationaux et internes, et leur interactions, est considéré. L'auteur avance l'hypothèse que la crise de l'État-nation n'exclut pas, et au contraire renforce, la possibilité de sa continuité ainsi que d'un interventionnisme et d'une autonomisation accrue, sous une variété de types et de formes politiques.

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