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Tradition and Change in the Study of International Relations in Australia

Richard Higgott and Jim George
International Political Science Review / Revue internationale de science politique
Vol. 11, No. 4 (Oct., 1990), pp. 423-438
Published by: Sage Publications, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1601520
Page Count: 16
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Tradition and Change in the Study of International Relations in Australia
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Abstract

Addressing international relations in Australia through the eyes of the scholar rather than the policymaker, this paper presents a partial and personal contribution to a growing sociology of knowledge of the discipline in general and in one country in particular. It outlines the centrality of a power politics realism to the Australian discipline, the central element of which has traditionally been the identification of "threats" and "protectors." From this historical introduction the paper moves to discuss one major change that is coming about in the nature of Australian threat perception, the essence of which is a growing sense of economic, as opposed to politico-strategic, vulnerability in an increasingly unpredictable economic order. The 1980s have seen the search for national economic well-being become as--if not more--salient an issue as is the search for politico-strategic security for scholars of international relations in Australia. /// Ecrit du point de vue particulier d'un analyste des relations internationales de l'Australie, cet article offre une contribution partielle et personnelle à la sociologie de la connaissance. La perspective dite 'réaliste' des relations de pouvoir a dominé les études autraliennes des relations internationales, comme l'on fait ses corollaires: l'identification de 'menaces' et de 'protecteurs'. Or, un changement est en train de se produire. La menace est de plus en plus perçue comme étant d'ordre économique plutôt que stratégique et politique, et cela en raison du caractère imprévisible de l'ordre économique.

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