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The Judicialization of Politics in Sweden

Barry Holmström
International Political Science Review / Revue internationale de science politique
Vol. 15, No. 2, The Judicialization of Politics. La judicialisation de la politique (Apr., 1994), pp. 153-164
Published by: Sage Publications, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1601563
Page Count: 12
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The Judicialization of Politics in Sweden
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Abstract

As to judicial intervention in politics, Sweden sides with skeptical states like the United Kingdom or Third and Fourth Republic France. The Social Democrats, in power for more than four decades, have consistently defended a majoritarian and popular sovereignty view of democracy, hostile to built-in checks on the elected representatives. But judgments of the European Court on Human Rights at Strasbourg, and a gradual weakening of the Social Democratic dominance in Swedish politics, have initiated a slow but steady process toward a more significant role for court litigation and the judicial branch. This judicialization of the political process will probably accelerate now that interest organizations have discovered this "American" way of influencing politics. /// Sur la question de l'intervention du judiciaire dans la politique, la Suède se range aux côtés des pays les plus sceptiques, le Royaume-Uni ou la France de la IIIe et de la IVe Républiques notamment. Les Socio-démocrates, au pouvoir pendant plus de trente ans, ont constamment défendu le principe du parlementarisme majoritaire, car ils étaient hostiles à toute entrave au pouvoir des élus. Les jugements de la Cour européenne des droits de l'homme de Strasbourg et l'affaiblissement progressif de la démocratie sociale sont en train de faciliter l'intervention de plus en plus marquée du judiciaire dans la vie politique. Cette intervention devrait se faire plus prononcée encore depuis que les groupes d'intérêt ont découvert la technique 'américaine' d'influence sur le politique par des recours devant les tribunaux.

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