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Metabolite Changes Associated with Heat Shocked Avian Fibroblast Mitochondria

Milton J. Schlesinger, Christine Ryan, Maggie M.-Y. Chi, Joyce G. Carter, Mary Ellen Pusateri and Oliver H. Lowry
Cell Stress & Chaperones
Vol. 2, No. 1 (Mar., 1997), pp. 25-30
Published by: Cell Stress Society International in partnership with Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1601989
Page Count: 6
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Metabolite Changes Associated with Heat Shocked Avian Fibroblast Mitochondria
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Abstract

A previous report from our laboratory (Collier et al 1993) showed that the elongated tubules of mitochondria in the cytoplasm of cultured chicken embryo fibroblasts collapsed to irregularly shaped structures surrounding the nuclear membrane after a 1 h heat shock treatment. The normal mitochondrial morphology reappeared upon removal of the thermal stress. We have now determined that several changes occurred in mitochondrial-related metabolites under these same heat shock and recovery conditions. Among these were significant decreases in the levels of fumarate and malate and increases in the amounts of aspartate and glutamate. In contrast, other intermediates of the tri-carboxylic acid cycle were unaltered as were levels of ATP and phosphocreatine. The changes observed might result from heat shock-induced changes in enzyme activities of the mitochondria, from alterations in the membrane-embedded specialized carrier proteins that transport metabolites between cytosol and mitochondria or from a disorganization of the electron-transport system normally coupled to oxidative metabolism. The rapid recovery, however, suggested that these changes were transient and readily reversible.

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