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Epidemiology of Divorce

Patricia H. Shiono and Linda Sandham Quinn
The Future of Children
Vol. 4, No. 1, Children and Divorce (Spring, 1994), pp. 15-28
Published by: Princeton University
DOI: 10.2307/1602475
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1602475
Page Count: 14
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Epidemiology of Divorce
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Abstract

The living arrangements of American children have been strongly affected by revolutionary social changes in the past 30 years. Large decreases in first-marriage rates and an increase in the likelihood of married couples to divorce have resulted in a wide diversity of living arrangements for children. In spite of increasing divorce rates, in 1990, the vast majority (71%) of the 64 million American children lived in two-parent households, and most (58%) lived with their biological parents. Since the 1970s, however, there has been a large increase in the proportion of children living with single or divorced mothers. Today, 7.3% (4.7 million) of children live with an unmarried parent, 9.1% (5.9 million) live with a divorced parent, and 7.4% (4.8 million) live with a separated or widowed parent. In each year since the 1970s, more than one million children were affected by divorce. The composition of single-parent households has also changed dramatically. The decreasing mortality rates in the past three decades among married individuals have resulted in fewer households headed by widowed parents. However, the decrease in widowed-parent households has been more than replaced by a corresponding increase in households headed by never-married women. Increasing divorce rates have resulted in more children living in stepfamilies and with divorced single mothers. Legal changes in the 1970s have resulted in an increase in the number of children living with divorced fathers. There are large differences in the living arrangements of children by ethnic group. In the past 25 years, there has been an exponential increase in the proportion of African-American children living with never-married mothers. The most common form of living arrangement for African-American children today is one-parent families.

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