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Working Women Scientists and Engineers

Betty M. Vetter
Science
New Series, Vol. 207, No. 4426 (Jan. 4, 1980), pp. 28-34
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1683180
Page Count: 7
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Working Women Scientists and Engineers
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Abstract

About 80 percent of women trained in science or engineering are in the labor force, but many are employed outside of their fields. Most who withdraw from the labor force do so temporarily, and about half do not take a career break even when they have small children. Factors affecting labor force participation are student status, highest degree level, parental status and age of children, and field of degree. Employment opportunities are restricted in some fields, and women have higher unemployment rates and lower earnings than men. Some policy changes would improve opportunities for women, and better data are needed to monitor their participation in science and technology.

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