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Journal Article

Flavor-Illness Aversions: The Peculiar Roles of Odor and Taste in Memory for Poison

Claire C. Palmerino, Kenneth W. Rusiniak and John Garcia
Science
New Series, Vol. 208, No. 4445 (May 16, 1980), pp. 753-755
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1683878
Page Count: 3

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Topics: Odors, Poisons, Poisoning, Gustatory perception, Food, Memory, Acquired taste, Flavors, Lithium, Predators
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Flavor-Illness Aversions: The Peculiar Roles of Odor and Taste in Memory for Poison
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Abstract

When either taste or odor alone was followed by poison, rats acquired a strong aversion for the taste but not for odor, especially if poison was delayed. When odor-taste combinations were poisoned, however, odor aversions were potentiated, as if odor could gain the enduring memorial property of taste by associative contiguity.

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