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The Cognitive Unconscious

John F. Kihlstrom
Science
New Series, Vol. 237, No. 4821 (Sep. 18, 1987), pp. 1445-1452
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1699849
Page Count: 8
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The Cognitive Unconscious
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Abstract

Contemporary research in cognitive psychology reveals the impact of nonconscious mental structures and processes on the individual's conscious experience, thought, and action. Research on perceptual-cognitive and motoric skills indicates that they are automatized through experience, and thus rendered unconscious. In addition, research on subliminal perception, implicit memory, and hypnosis indicates that events can affect mental functions even though they cannot be consciously perceived or remembered. These findings suggest a tripartite division of the cognitive unconscious into truly unconscious mental processes operating on knowledge structures that may themselves be preconscious or subconscious.

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