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Behavioral Neurophysiology: Insights into Seeing and Grasping

Steven P. Wise and Robert Desimone
Science
New Series, Vol. 242, No. 4879 (Nov. 4, 1988), pp. 736-741
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1702142
Page Count: 6
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Behavioral Neurophysiology: Insights into Seeing and Grasping
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Abstract

One marvels at a batter's ability to hit a baseball traveling at 150 kilometers per hour or a monkey's skill in snatching a flying insect. Indeed, the ability of many animals to reach out, grasp, and manipulate objects is a feat of biological engineering unmatched by even state-of-the-art robots. But how are the objects of our attention chosen and how are the eyes and hands directed to it? Recent progress in behavioral neurophysiology has clarified some of the brain mechanisms at work.

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