Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Effects of the Large June 1975 Meteoroid Storm on Earth's Ionosphere

P. Kaufmann, V. L. R. Kuntz, N. M. Paes Leme, L. R. Piazza, J. W. S. Vilas Boas, K. Brecher and J. Crouchley
Science
New Series, Vol. 246, No. 4931 (Nov. 10, 1989), pp. 787-790
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1704722
Page Count: 4
  • More info
  • Cite this Item
Effects of the Large June 1975 Meteoroid Storm on Earth's Ionosphere
Preview not available

Abstract

The June 1975 meteoroid storm detected on the moon by the Apollo seismometers was the largest ever observed. Reexamination of radio data taken at that time showed that the storm also produced pronounced disturbances on Earth, which were recorded as unique phase anomalies on very low frequency (VLF) radio propagation paths in the low terrestrial ionosphere. Persistent effects were observed for the major storm period (20 to 30 June 1975), including reductions in the diurnal phase variation, advances in the nighttime and daytime phase levels, and reductions in the sunset phase delay rate. Large nighttime phase advances, lasting a few hours, were detected on some days at all VLF transmissions, and for the shorter propagation path they were comparable to solar Lyman alpha daytime ionization. Ion production rates attributable to the meteor storm were estimated to be about 0.6 to 3.0 ions per centimeter cubed per second at the E and D regions, respectively. The storm was a sporadic one with a radiant (that is, the point of apparent origin in the sky) located in the Southern Hemisphere, with a right ascension 1 to 2 hours larger than the sun's right ascension.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
787
    787
  • Thumbnail: Page 
788
    788
  • Thumbnail: Page 
789
    789
  • Thumbnail: Page 
790
    790