Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

America's Vietnam Casualties: Victims of a Class War?

Arnold Barnett, Timothy Stanley and Michael Shore
Operations Research
Vol. 40, No. 5 (Sep. - Oct., 1992), pp. 856-866
Published by: INFORMS
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/171812
Page Count: 11
  • Download ($30.00)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
America's Vietnam Casualties: Victims of a Class War?
Preview not available

Abstract

Analysis of data about the 58,000 Americans killed in Vietnam implies that affluent U.S. communities had only marginally lower casualty rates than the nation as a whole. Poor communities had only marginally higher rates. Data about the residential addresses of war casualties suggest that, within both large heterogeneous cities and wealthy suburbs, there was little relationship between neighborhood incomes and per capita Vietnam death rates. Such outcomes call into question a widespread belief that continues to influence U.S. policy discussions, namely, that American war deaths in Vietnam were overwhelmingly concentrated among the poor and working class.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
856
    856
  • Thumbnail: Page 
857
    857
  • Thumbnail: Page 
858
    858
  • Thumbnail: Page 
859
    859
  • Thumbnail: Page 
860
    860
  • Thumbnail: Page 
861
    861
  • Thumbnail: Page 
862
    862
  • Thumbnail: Page 
863
    863
  • Thumbnail: Page 
864
    864
  • Thumbnail: Page 
865
    865
  • Thumbnail: Page 
866
    866