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The Impact of Family Planning Service Provision on Contraceptive-Use Dynamics in Morocco

Fiona Steele, Sian L. Curtis and Minja Choe
Studies in Family Planning
Vol. 30, No. 1 (Mar., 1999), pp. 28-42
Published by: Population Council
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/172303
Page Count: 15
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Impact of Family Planning Service Provision on Contraceptive-Use Dynamics in Morocco
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Abstract

This article uses linked data from the 1995 Morocco DHS calendar and the 1992 Morocco DHS service-availability module to study the effect of service environment on contraceptive discontinuation, switching, and adoption of a modern method following a birth. The 1995 Morocco DHS also collected information on the source of supply for each episode of use of a modern method recorded in the calendar, allowing study of the association between the source of supply and discontinuation and switching rates. Multilevel event-history models are used to evaluate the impact of individual-level sociodemographic characteristics and community-level indicators of family planning service provision. The findings show that the presence of a nearby public health center is associated with higher modern-method adoption after a birth and lower method-failure rates; the presence of a pharmacy is associated with lower discontinuation due to side effects or health concerns. The degree of method-choice potential has a positive impact on both the rate of switching from the pill to another modern method and on modern-method adoption after a birth.

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