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Barking, Dominance, and Territoriality in Male Sea Lions

Ronald J. Schusterman and Ronald G. Dawson
Science
New Series, Vol. 160, No. 3826 (Apr. 26, 1968), pp. 434-436
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1723540
Page Count: 3
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Barking, Dominance, and Territoriality in Male Sea Lions
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Abstract

Experiments in which male sea lions (Zalophus californianus) were removed and reintroduced into a social group demonstrate that barking by larger males restricts movement and barking by other smaller males. Barking and aggression were primarily directed toward animals of most nearly equal size. Two 6-year-olds seeking to establish and maintain territorial status used aggressive tactics similar to those observed in breeding males in the field.

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