Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Some Psychosocial and Cultural Factors in the Arab-Israeli Conflict: A Review of the Literature

Benjamin Beit-Hallahmi
The Journal of Conflict Resolution
Vol. 16, No. 2, Research Perspectives on the Arab-Israeli Conflict: A Symposium (Jun., 1972), pp. 269-280
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/173319
Page Count: 12
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($40.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Some Psychosocial and Cultural Factors in the Arab-Israeli Conflict: A Review of the Literature
Preview not available

Abstract

This review is an introductory guide to the literature on selected psychosocial and cultural aspects of the Arab-Israeli conflict. Its aims are to survey some of the scientific and nonscientific efforts that have been made to understand the psychosocial bases of behaviors in this conflict, and to clarify evidence related to major propositions regarding the impact of those bases. Its scope was limited by accepting the basic caveats of Kelman and Etzioni. Attempts to deal with the history and present status of the conflict from a psychological perspective were classified into three groups: psychological-theoretical, psychological-empirical, and historical-ideological. This group of overviews was used as a source of propositions and hypotheses, and three issues were selected as the foci for this review: (1) cultural characteristics and "national character" as parameters in the conflict; (2) the internal function of external conflict as an impediment to solution on both sides; and (3) optimism and the uses of psychology in reaching for a resolution.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[269]
    [269]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
270
    270
  • Thumbnail: Page 
271
    271
  • Thumbnail: Page 
272
    272
  • Thumbnail: Page 
273
    273
  • Thumbnail: Page 
274
    274
  • Thumbnail: Page 
275
    275
  • Thumbnail: Page 
276
    276
  • Thumbnail: Page 
277
    277
  • Thumbnail: Page 
278
    278
  • Thumbnail: Page 
279
    279
  • Thumbnail: Page 
280
    280