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Is the Test Score Decline Responsible for the Productivity Growth Decline?

John H. Bishop
The American Economic Review
Vol. 79, No. 1 (Mar., 1989), pp. 178-197
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1804780
Page Count: 20
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Is the Test Score Decline Responsible for the Productivity Growth Decline?
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Abstract

The test score decline between 1967 and 1980 was large (about 1.25 grade-level equivalents) and historically unprecedented. New estimates of trends in academic achievement, of the effect of academic achievement on productivity and of trends in the quality of the work force are developed. They imply that if test scores had continued to grow after 1967 at the rate that prevailed in the previous quarter century, labor quality would now be 2.9 percent higher and 1987 GNP $86 billion higher.

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