Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

'Discipline without Oppression': Sequence, Timing and Marginality in Southern Rhodesia's Post-War Development Regime

Eric Worby
The Journal of African History
Vol. 41, No. 1 (2000), pp. 101-125
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/183512
Page Count: 25
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
'Discipline without Oppression': Sequence, Timing and Marginality in Southern Rhodesia's Post-War Development Regime
Preview not available

Abstract

The regime of 'development' that emerged in post-war Southern Rhodesia was organized around a naturalized racial axis that differentiated among African and European populations, both culturally and politically. A series of legislative acts and administrative innovations were devoted to the reform of four principal domains of African rural life: the disciplining of hygienic practice, the stabilization of the monogamous family, the regularization of land tenure and the rationalization of agrarian techniques. These sites of intervention were considered integral to the task of reconciling conservation imperatives with political exigencies, particularly the demand that Africans be removed from European-designated farmland while sustaining the promise to increase black prosperity. The unity of these objectives in policy discourse quickly dissolved, however, when local administrators and agricultural extension officers were faced with the task of implementing the means to attain them. An analysis of two adjacent African reserves in the north-west - Sanyati and Gokwe - illustrates the importance of the timing and sequence according to which regions were drawn into the prescriptive apparatus of the development regime. These malarial, tsetse-infested lowlands, remote from the major axes of urban and industrial development, were located in a region distinguished by the historical absence of competing claims by European settlers to land. Sanyati began to receive immigrants forcibly resettled from white farms in the central midlands and south-eastern reserves in the 1950s, at a time when the coercive, hyper-rational model of development was reaching its apogee behind the passage of the Native Land Husbandry Act. A decade later, Gokwe received waves of the same immigrant population under conditions of greater administrative freedom. Targeting immigrants who had already internalized the 'discipline' of development and styled themselves as 'modern', Gokwe's extension staff was able to institute a voluntary, cotton-based regime, one widely regarded as a model of African rural 'advancement'.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
101
    101
  • Thumbnail: Page 
102
    102
  • Thumbnail: Page 
103
    103
  • Thumbnail: Page 
104
    104
  • Thumbnail: Page 
105
    105
  • Thumbnail: Page 
106
    106
  • Thumbnail: Page 
107
    107
  • Thumbnail: Page 
108
    108
  • Thumbnail: Page 
109
    109
  • Thumbnail: Page 
110
    110
  • Thumbnail: Page 
111
    111
  • Thumbnail: Page 
112
    112
  • Thumbnail: Page 
113
    113
  • Thumbnail: Page 
114
    114
  • Thumbnail: Page 
115
    115
  • Thumbnail: Page 
116
    116
  • Thumbnail: Page 
117
    117
  • Thumbnail: Page 
118
    118
  • Thumbnail: Page 
119
    119
  • Thumbnail: Page 
120
    120
  • Thumbnail: Page 
121
    121
  • Thumbnail: Page 
122
    122
  • Thumbnail: Page 
123
    123
  • Thumbnail: Page 
124
    124
  • Thumbnail: Page 
125
    125