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What Is a Game?

Bernard Suits
Philosophy of Science
Vol. 34, No. 2 (Jun., 1967), pp. 148-156
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/186102
Page Count: 9
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What Is a Game?
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Abstract

By means of a critical examination of a number of theses as to the nature of game-playing, the following definition is advanced: To play a game is to engage in activity directed toward bringing about a specific state of affairs, using only means permitted by specific rules, where the means permitted by the rules are more limited in scope than they would be in the absence of the rules, and where the sole reason for accepting such limitation is to make possible such activity.

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