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Gender Role Attitudes in the Southern United States

Tom W. Rice and Diane L. Coates
Gender and Society
Vol. 9, No. 6 (Dec., 1995), pp. 744-756
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/189539
Page Count: 13
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Gender Role Attitudes in the Southern United States
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Abstract

It is widely believed that gender role attitudes are more traditional in the southern United States than elsewhere in the nation. We examine this notion, using eight gender-related questions from the NORC General Social Survey data. Responses to these questions suggest that Southerners tend to hold more conservative opinions on questions about women in politics and employed women. On questions of whether employed women can be good mothers, however, Southern and non-Southern opinions are very similar. An examination of how Southerners and non-Southerners answered the gender questions over time shows that attitudes in both regions have become more egalitarian.

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