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The Bounds of Law: Universality in Science

David Gruender
PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association
Vol. 1984, Volume One: Contributed Papers (1984), pp. 95-101
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/192330
Page Count: 7
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The Bounds of Law: Universality in Science
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Abstract

Giving attention both to the history of modern science and to current work in the natural sciences, the importance of requiring that natural laws be treated as universal with respect to space and time is discussed critically. It is concluded that the view that such a requirement be taken as a definitional criterion characterizing laws of nature--or science itself--is not justified, and that the deductive advantages of universality can be preserved with local laws using scope limitations or sortal techniques.

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