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Computational Models in the Philosophy of Science

Paul Thagard
PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association
Vol. 1986, Volume Two: Symposia and Invited Papers (1986), pp. 329-335
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/192811
Page Count: 7
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Computational Models in the Philosophy of Science
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Abstract

Computational models can aid in the development of philosophical views concerning the structure and growth of scientific knowledge. In cognitive psychology, computational models have proved valuable for describing the structures and processes of thought and for testing these models by writing and running computer programs using the techniques of artificial intelligence. Similarly, in the philosophy of science models can be developed that shed light on the structure, discovery, and justification of scientific theories. This paper briefly describes a computational model of problem solving and learning that has been used to simulate several kinds of scientific reasoning.

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