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Arguments in a Sartorial Mode, or the Asymmetries of History and Philosophy of Science

Robert J. Richards
PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association
Vol. 1992, Volume Two: Symposia and Invited Papers (1992), pp. 482-489
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/192861
Page Count: 8
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Abstract

History of science and philosophy of science are not perfectly complementary disciplines. Several important asymmetries govern their relationship. These asymmetries, concerning levels of analysis, evidence, theories, writing, and training show that to be a decent philosopher of science is more difficult than being a decent historian. But to be a good historian-well, the degree of difficulty is reversed.

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