If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

A Case Study in the Application of Mathematics to Physics: Descartes' Principles of Philosophy, Part II

Emily R. Grosholz
PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association
Vol. 1986, Volume One: Contributed Papers (1986), pp. 116-124
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/193113
Page Count: 9
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
A Case Study in the Application of Mathematics to Physics: Descartes' Principles of Philosophy, Part II
Preview not available

Abstract

The question of how and why mathematics can be applied to physical reality should be approached through the history of science, as a series of case studies which may reveal both generalizable patterns and salient differences in the grounds and nature of that application from era to era. The present examination of Descartes' Principles of Philosophy Part II, reveals a deep ambiguity in the relation of Euclidean geometry to res extensa, and a tension between geometrical form and 'common motion of parts' as principles of individuation for matter in Cartesian physics.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[116]
    [116]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
117
    117
  • Thumbnail: Page 
118
    118
  • Thumbnail: Page 
119
    119
  • Thumbnail: Page 
120
    120
  • Thumbnail: Page 
121
    121
  • Thumbnail: Page 
122
    122
  • Thumbnail: Page 
123
    123
  • Thumbnail: Page 
124
    124