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Macroflora, Mycoflora, and Soil Relationships in a Pine Plantation

Martin Witkamp
Ecology
Vol. 47, No. 2 (Mar., 1966), pp. 238-244
Published by: Wiley
DOI: 10.2307/1933770
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1933770
Page Count: 7
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Macroflora, Mycoflora, and Soil Relationships in a Pine Plantation
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Abstract

Species distribution of the ground cover of a Scots pine stand along the slope of a fixed inland dune closely reflected micro-relief and profile of the soil. Depth of a fine sand deck on coarse sand varied from 0 cm at the bottom to 150 cm at the top of the dune. Corresponding water-holding capacity (WHC) to a depth of 150 cm varied from 459 to 284 liters/m^2. Tree height was significantly correlated with WHC. Dependance of litter and humus formation on primary production, and of mycelium growth on litter and humus resulted in significant correlation of these factors and moisture. Mycelium length was significantly correlated with fungal plate counts in January. The annual cycle of mycelium length did not show a peak in autumn as was found in broad leaft forest, presumably a result of differences in nutrient release from the litter. Of the organic mass to a depth of 1 m trees contributed 13%-34%, ground cover + litter + humus 49%-66%, soil organic matter 16%-22%, and fungal mycelium in soil 0.6%-0.9%. Reasons for the low fungal mass may be its ephemeral character, low influx of organic matter into the soil, and presence of much mycelium which was not measured on top of the soil.

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