If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Water Relations of Australian Burrowing Frogs and Tree Frogs

A. R. Main and P. J. Bentley
Ecology
Vol. 45, No. 2 (Apr., 1964), pp. 379-382
DOI: 10.2307/1933854
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1933854
Page Count: 4
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Water Relations of Australian Burrowing Frogs and Tree Frogs
Preview not available

Abstract

Water uptake after dehydration was measured in the desert species Cyclorana platycephalus, Notaden nichollsi, and four species of tree frogs of the genus Hyla (caerulea, latopalmata, rubella, moorei). Hyla moorei is least tolerant to desiccation and exhibits faster uptake of water whereas H. caerulea withstood the most extreme desiccation. Maximum water content of the body (fat bodies out) was greatest in the burrowing desert frog Notaden nichollsi and least in Hyla moorei. It is suggested that in frogs there are three ways of avoiding death by desiccation, viz., behaviorally, high body water content, and rapid rehydration when water is available.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
379
    379
  • Thumbnail: Page 
380
    380
  • Thumbnail: Page 
381
    381
  • Thumbnail: Page 
382
    382