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Species Diversity and Longitudinal Succession in Stream Fishes

Andrew L. Sheldon
Ecology
Vol. 49, No. 2 (Mar., 1968), pp. 193-198
DOI: 10.2307/1934447
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1934447
Page Count: 6
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Species Diversity and Longitudinal Succession in Stream Fishes
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Abstract

A quantitative survey was made of the distribution and abundance of fishes in Owego Creek, New York. Four of the five headwaters species occurred throughout the area and two of these species dominated the fauna in all areas. Thirty-one species were found in the area. Succession took the form of additions to the headwaters assemblage and replacement was of minor importance. Regression analyses show that the number of species in any area was correlated most strongly with stream depth although an effect of position was also significant. Species diversity (information theoretic) was independent of position and depended on depth alone. Behavioral observations support the importance of the depth factor.

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