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Seasonal Soil Moisture Patterns in Adjacent Greasewood and Sagebrush Stands

W. H. Rickard
Ecology
Vol. 48, No. 6 (Nov., 1967), pp. 1034-1038
Published by: Wiley
DOI: 10.2307/1934561
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1934561
Page Count: 5
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Seasonal Soil Moisture Patterns in Adjacent Greasewood and Sagebrush Stands
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Abstract

Soil moisture measurements were made over a 2-year period in adjacent greasewood (Sarcobatus vermiculatus) and sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) stands in the desert steppe region of southeastern Washington. Soil moisture accumulated during fall and winter. The greater accumulation of moisture in the upper 4 dm of the greasewood stand appeared to be the result of decreased evaporation losses and the lack of transpiration from shrub species which are leafless during winter and early spring. The more luxuriant growth of cheatgrass in the greasewood stand was related to winter and spring retention of soil moisture.

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