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Experimental Zoogeography of Islands: A Model for Insular Colonization

Daniel S Simberloff
Ecology
Vol. 50, No. 2 (Mar., 1969), pp. 296-314
Published by: Wiley
DOI: 10.2307/1934857
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1934857
Page Count: 19
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Experimental Zoogeography of Islands: A Model for Insular Colonization
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Abstract

A distinction is made between immigration rate (in spp./time) for an island, and invasion rate (in propagules/time) for a species and an island. An analogous distinction is drawn between an island extinction rate and a species extinction rate (or intrinsic probability of extinction in a given time interval). It is claimed that the most objective definition for @'propagule@' is any animal of group capable of population increase under any conceivable circumstances. Immigration and island extinction curves are unique only if plotted against time, not against number of species. A model for non-interactive colonization is discussed, and its equilibrium number of species, @? derived. It is shown that data from the defaunated Florida Keys can be interpreted as arising from non-interactive colonization to an @? near the non-interactive @? (and to a point above a more enduring interactive @?), followed by a slow decline in @? (as population sizes and interaction increase) to an enduring @? near that obtaining before defaunation. The effect on this scheme of increasing distance from source area is shown, and a simulation of the non-interactive part of the scheme was performed with corroborates that part of the model. Explicit equations for the @'expected@' colonization, immigration, and island extinction curves are given for non-interactive colonization, and predictions are given about the general changes in these curves as interaction becomes significant.

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