Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Development of Party Identification among Adults: Exploration of a Functional Model

W. Phillips Shively
The American Political Science Review
Vol. 73, No. 4 (Dec., 1979), pp. 1039-1054
DOI: 10.2307/1953988
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1953988
Page Count: 16
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Development of Party Identification among Adults: Exploration of a Functional Model
Preview not available

Abstract

This article proposes a model for the systematic development of adults' party identification, based on voters' need for a way to handle difficult electoral decisions. Several variables are noted which should heighten this need, thus making it more likely that voters will develop party identification. The model is partially tested, in an exploratory way, by analysis of panel data from the United States and Britain, and by cohort analysis of United States elections from 1952 to 1976. I develop the following implications of the model: (1) the "life-cycle" process by which party identification increases with age may be largely a function of difficulty in meeting information costs; (2) the process by which party identification, once it exists, becomes stronger appears to differ from the process by which voters move from independence to identification; (3) class-consciousness, in the presence of class parties, may obviate the need for direct identification with parties; (4) the American electorate appears increasingly to be one in which political change may occur regularly, rather than through the fitful process of realignment.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1039
    1039
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1040
    1040
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1041
    1041
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1042
    1042
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1043
    1043
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1044
    1044
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1045
    1045
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1046
    1046
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1047
    1047
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1048
    1048
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1049
    1049
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1050
    1050
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1051
    1051
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1052
    1052
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1053
    1053
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1054
    1054