Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Political Stability of Two-Party and Multiparty Systems: Probabilistic Bases for the Comparison of Party Systems

Manus I. Midlarsky
The American Political Science Review
Vol. 78, No. 4 (Dec., 1984), pp. 929-951
DOI: 10.2307/1955799
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1955799
Page Count: 23
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Political Stability of Two-Party and Multiparty Systems: Probabilistic Bases for the Comparison of Party Systems
Preview not available

Abstract

The stability of the American two-party system is examined from 1866 until 1980. Following the approach of Strkes and Iversen (1962), restoring forces are posited for presidential elections, but restraining forces also are suggested for congressional elections, leading to an equilibrium between the two in elections to the House. Points of maximum restoration in presidential elections are derived using autocorrelations, and these points suggest a pattern of second-term Republican victories every 28 years beginning in 1872. Equilibrium properties of the American two-party system lead to the twin criteria of representation and restraint in multiparty cabinet coalitions in order to achieve cabinet durabilities on the order of those found in two-party systems. Minimum entropy-minimum winning coalitions satisfy these criteria. Cabinet durabilities on the order of two-party systems can be achieved by means of a 44-45 percentage of the legislative seats won by the first party in a multiparty system.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
929
    929
  • Thumbnail: Page 
930
    930
  • Thumbnail: Page 
931
    931
  • Thumbnail: Page 
932
    932
  • Thumbnail: Page 
933
    933
  • Thumbnail: Page 
934
    934
  • Thumbnail: Page 
935
    935
  • Thumbnail: Page 
936
    936
  • Thumbnail: Page 
937
    937
  • Thumbnail: Page 
938
    938
  • Thumbnail: Page 
939
    939
  • Thumbnail: Page 
940
    940
  • Thumbnail: Page 
941
    941
  • Thumbnail: Page 
942
    942
  • Thumbnail: Page 
943
    943
  • Thumbnail: Page 
944
    944
  • Thumbnail: Page 
945
    945
  • Thumbnail: Page 
946
    946
  • Thumbnail: Page 
947
    947
  • Thumbnail: Page 
948
    948
  • Thumbnail: Page 
949
    949
  • Thumbnail: Page 
950
    950
  • Thumbnail: Page 
951
    951