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Interest Representation: The Dominance of Institutions

Robert H. Salisbury
The American Political Science Review
Vol. 78, No. 1 (Mar., 1984), pp. 64-76
DOI: 10.2307/1961249
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1961249
Page Count: 13
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Interest Representation: The Dominance of Institutions
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Abstract

Interest group theory traditionally assumed that policies advocated by group representatives in some sense grow out of the interests or values of the group's members. Mancur Olson and others compelled important revisions in this assumption, but still left the process of interest advocacy to membership groups. It is contended here that institutions, such as corporations or local governments, occupy a dominant position with respect to interest representation in Washington, and this finding requires substantial revisions in both theoretical and descriptive formulations of the governmental process.

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