If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Party Identification, Realignment, and Party Voting: Back to the Basics

Warren E. Miller
The American Political Science Review
Vol. 85, No. 2 (Jun., 1991), pp. 557-568
DOI: 10.2307/1963175
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1963175
Page Count: 12
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Party Identification, Realignment, and Party Voting: Back to the Basics
Preview not available

Abstract

The argument is presented for defining party identification by the root question, @'Generally speaking, do you usually think of yourself as a Republican, a Democrat, an independent, or what?@' With this definitional base, the partisan balance between Democrats and Republicans between 1952 and 1980 shows no evidence of realignment outside the South, belying the implications of the Markus--Converse and Fiorina analyses that suggest volatility in response to short-term influences. It also appears that the correlation between party identification and voter choices for president are very constant over time in the South as well as outside the South. Party line voting by party identifiers varies by region and party but did not decrease between 1952 and 1988.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
557
    557
  • Thumbnail: Page 
558
    558
  • Thumbnail: Page 
559
    559
  • Thumbnail: Page 
560
    560
  • Thumbnail: Page 
561
    561
  • Thumbnail: Page 
562
    562
  • Thumbnail: Page 
563
    563
  • Thumbnail: Page 
564
    564
  • Thumbnail: Page 
565
    565
  • Thumbnail: Page 
566
    566
  • Thumbnail: Page 
567
    567
  • Thumbnail: Page 
568
    568