If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

The Just and the Advantageous in Thucydides: The Case of the Mytilenaian Debate

Clifford Orwin
The American Political Science Review
Vol. 78, No. 2 (Jun., 1984), pp. 485-494
DOI: 10.2307/1963377
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1963377
Page Count: 10
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
The Just and the Advantageous in Thucydides: The Case of the Mytilenaian Debate
Preview not available

Abstract

As no passage in Thucydides is more important, so none is more dramatic than the Mytilenaian Debate. Having resolved to punish harshly a rebel city, the Athenians repent and reconsider. Exhorted by Kleon to maintain their original decision and by Diototos to abandon it, the Athenians must scrutinize the relatinship between justice and expediency. Diodotos, who processes to argue from interest only, narrowly prevails in the debate. There is, however, much more to his speech than meets the eye. For it proves misleading to say that he is arguing merely from interest--and then, on a deeper level, to say that he is arguing from justice. In fact no passage in Thucydides, including the Melian Dialogue, raises straker questions about the status of political justice.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
485
    485
  • Thumbnail: Page 
486
    486
  • Thumbnail: Page 
487
    487
  • Thumbnail: Page 
488
    488
  • Thumbnail: Page 
489
    489
  • Thumbnail: Page 
490
    490
  • Thumbnail: Page 
491
    491
  • Thumbnail: Page 
492
    492
  • Thumbnail: Page 
493
    493
  • Thumbnail: Page 
494
    494