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Physicians vs. Auxiliary Nurse-Midwives as Providers of IUD Services: A Study In Turkey and the Philippines

N. Eren, R. Ramos and R. H. Gray
Studies in Family Planning
Vol. 14, No. 2 (Feb., 1983), pp. 43-47
Published by: Population Council
DOI: 10.2307/1965401
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1965401
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Physicians vs. Auxiliary Nurse-Midwives as Providers of IUD Services: A Study In Turkey and the Philippines
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Abstract

Several studies have shown that nurses, nurse mid-wives, and paramedical personnel can provide satisfactory BUD services, but restrictions are still placed upon their provision of these services. A randomized trial of auxiliary nurse-midwife and physician BUD services was conducted among 495 interval acceptors in Turkey and 510 postpartum acceptors in the Philippines to further evaluate this question. Discontinuations due to expulsion, removal, and pregnancy were comparable for physician and nurse-midwife clients. Among Filipino women who experienced an early expulsion, nurse-midwives reinserted a device in significantly more cases (54.5 percent) than physicians (31.1 percent). The diagnosis of contraindication or complications was similar in the two groups. Turkish women frequently refused to have pelvic examinations by male physicians, and in the Philippines, nurse-midwives provided better follow-up than physicians. We conclude that auxiliary nurse-midwives can provide clinical services comparable to those provided by doctors, and may give better continuation of care because they are more accessible and acceptable clients.

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