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Discourses of Regeneration in Early Twentieth-Century Britain: From Bedlam to the Imperial War Museum

Steven Cooke and Lloyd Jenkins
Area
Vol. 33, No. 4 (Dec., 2001), pp. 382-390
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20004179
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Discourses of Regeneration in Early Twentieth-Century Britain: From Bedlam to the Imperial War Museum
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Abstract

This paper examines the building that presently houses the Imperial War Museum, investigating the transformation of the archetypal 'mad space' of the Bethlem Royal Hospital into what has been described as the 'biggest boy's bedroom in London'. Following recent concerns in human geography with Imperial cities, it highlights the differing ways in which this transformation embodies a number of themes of degeneration and regeneration in early twentieth-century Britain.

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