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Inclusion and Incarnation: A Response to Bayne

Richard Sturch
Religious Studies
Vol. 39, No. 1 (Mar., 2003), pp. 103-106
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20008450
Page Count: 4
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Inclusion and Incarnation: A Response to Bayne
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Abstract

I suggest that Tim Bayne's use of the term 'inclusion' to describe the model of the Incarnation found in Morris and Swinburne may have misled him. The experiences of the Word do not include those of Jesus in the way that mine include my experiences as a teenager; but He is aware, in the case of Jesus, that 'these experiences are mine', which is not true of His awareness of the experiences of other people. Again, Bayne rejects the idea that what differentiates the experiences of Jesus from those of the Word is that they differ in kind, on the grounds that they are integrated so as to be co-conscious in the divine consciousness; but this is only true if we think in terms of 'inclusion'. Nor are any false beliefs held by Jesus part of the beliefs of the Word. Furthermore (although this is not related to 'inclusion') while a single soul may be sufficient to unite experiences, it need not be necessary; some other factor may (and I think does) unite the human and divine experiences of Christ.

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