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Infimus gradus libertatis? Descartes on Indifference and Divine Freedom

Dan Kaufman
Religious Studies
Vol. 39, No. 4 (Dec., 2003), pp. 391-406
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20008487
Page Count: 16
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Infimus gradus libertatis? Descartes on Indifference and Divine Freedom
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Abstract

Descartes held the doctrine that the eternal truths are freely created by God. He seems to have thought that a proper understanding of God's freedom entails such a doctrine concerning the eternal truths. In this paper, I examine Descartes' account of divine freedom. I argue that Descartes' statements about indifference, namely that indifference is the lowest grade of freedom and that indifference is the essence of God's freedom are not incompatible. I also show how Descartes arrived at his doctrine of the creation of the eternal truths by consideration of the nature of God's freedom.

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