Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Good, God, and the Open-Question Argument

Andrew Fisher
Religious Studies
Vol. 41, No. 3 (Sep., 2005), pp. 335-341
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20008602
Page Count: 7
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Good, God, and the Open-Question Argument
Preview not available

Abstract

In "Finite and Infinite Goods," Robert Adams defends his metaphysical account that good is resemblance to God via an 'open-question' intuition. It is, however, unclear what this intuition amounts to. I give two possible readings: one based on the semantic framework Adams employs, and another based on Adams's account of humankind's epistemological limitations. I argue that neither of these readings achieves Adams's advertised aim.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
335
    335
  • Thumbnail: Page 
336
    336
  • Thumbnail: Page 
337
    337
  • Thumbnail: Page 
338
    338
  • Thumbnail: Page 
339
    339
  • Thumbnail: Page 
340
    340
  • Thumbnail: Page 
341
    341