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Good, God, and the Open-Question Argument

Andrew Fisher
Religious Studies
Vol. 41, No. 3 (Sep., 2005), pp. 335-341
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20008602
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Good, God, and the Open-Question Argument
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Abstract

In "Finite and Infinite Goods," Robert Adams defends his metaphysical account that good is resemblance to God via an 'open-question' intuition. It is, however, unclear what this intuition amounts to. I give two possible readings: one based on the semantic framework Adams employs, and another based on Adams's account of humankind's epistemological limitations. I argue that neither of these readings achieves Adams's advertised aim.

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