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Time after Augustine

James Wetzel
Religious Studies
Vol. 31, No. 3 (Sep., 1995), pp. 341-357
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20019756
Page Count: 17
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Time after Augustine
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Abstract

This essay attempts to make sense of Augustine's claim that time is a mental affection. He has been criticized, by Russell for instance, for advocating a subjective theory of time, thereby confusing the issue of what time is with the issue of what it is like to experience time. I defend Augustine from this criticism. His interest in time emerges out of confessional philosophy, and when this context is taken into account, his association of time with affection implies the converse of what it has mostly been taken to imply: not that time is in his experience of time, but that his experience of time is discomfortingly timeless.

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