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A New Interpretation of Hume's 'Of Miracles'

Chris Slupik
Religious Studies
Vol. 31, No. 4 (Dec., 1995), pp. 517-536
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20019778
Page Count: 20
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A New Interpretation of Hume's 'Of Miracles'
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Abstract

It has often been suggested (1) that according to Hume it is impossible in principle for testimony to prove a miracle, and (2) that an indispensable element in Hume's argument is the claim that a miracle is by definition a violation of the laws of nature. I argue that both (1) and (2) are mistaken, and that, once Hume's 'Of Miracles' is viewed in a proper historical context, it emerges that Hume's argument against miracles is considerably different from what is usually supposed.

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