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The Dalai Lama and the World Religions: A False Friend?

Jane Compson
Religious Studies
Vol. 32, No. 2 (Jun., 1996), pp. 271-279
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20019814
Page Count: 9
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The Dalai Lama and the World Religions: A False Friend?
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Abstract

The Dalai Lama is well known for his tolerance of other religious traditions, actively encouraging people to celebrate their own faiths rather than convert to Buddhism. However, far from being a pluralist as this attitude suggests, he believes that ultimate liberation is obtained only through the practice of Buddhist teachings. This apparent contradiction is resolved when one examines some of the teachings that he follows, such as the notions of emptiness (śūnyatā), skilful means (upāya), karma and rebirth. On such examination it becomes apparent that it is precisely through the prioritising of these Buddhist teachings that his tolerance is rendered possible.

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