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A Natural History of Peace

Robert M. Sapolsky
Foreign Affairs
Vol. 85, No. 1 (Jan. - Feb., 2006), pp. 104-120
DOI: 10.2307/20031846
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20031846
Page Count: 17
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A Natural History of Peace
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Abstract

Humans like to think that they are unique, but the study of other primate has called into question the exceptionalism of our species. So what does primatology have to say about war and peace? Contrary to what was believed just a few decades ago, humans are not "killer apes" destined for violent conflict, but can make their own history.

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