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Korea's Place in the Axis

Victor D. Cha
Foreign Affairs
Vol. 81, No. 3 (May - Jun., 2002), pp. 79-92
DOI: 10.2307/20033164
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20033164
Page Count: 14
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Korea's Place in the Axis
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Abstract

President Bush's condemnation of North Korea as part of the "axis of evil" caused confusion worldwide, as allies and enemies alike tried to discern his administration's constantly shifting policy toward Pyongyang. But there is method to the madness. Look closely, and a consistent strategy emerges: "hawk engagement." Although Bush's team may use tactics seemingly similar to those of Clinton's, the administration wants to engage Kim Jong Il for very different reasons: to set him up for a fall.

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