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Giving Taipei a Place at the Table

Ross H. Munro
Foreign Affairs
Vol. 73, No. 6 (Nov. - Dec., 1994), pp. 109-122
DOI: 10.2307/20046932
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20046932
Page Count: 14
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Giving Taipei a Place at the Table
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Abstract

Taiwan's campaign to return to the United Nations merits serious attention. China is hurting its own interests by failing to understand the factors--most important, the democratization of Taiwan--that drove Taipei to seek membership. Taiwan knows that the road to the United Nations ultimately goes through Beijing, and China can promote the goal of eventual reunification if it endorses Taiwan's bid. Given that Taipei has made its U.N. participation negotiable, Beijing should recognize the opening that is being presented.

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