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Lyso-Phosphatidylcholine Is a Signal in the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis

David Drissner, Gernot Kunze, Nico Callewaert, Peter Gehrig, M'Barek Tamasloukht, Thomas Boller, Georg Felix, Nikolaus Amrhein and Marcel Bucher
Science
New Series, Vol. 318, No. 5848 (Oct. 12, 2007), pp. 265-268
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20048589
Page Count: 4
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Abstract

The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis represents the most widely distributed mutualistic root symbiosis. We report that root extracts of mycorrihizal plants contain a lipophilic signal capable of inducing the phosphate transporter genes StPT3 and StPT4 of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), genes that are specifically induced in roots colonized by AM fungi. The same signal caused rapid extracellular alkalinization in suspension-cultured tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) cells and induction of the mycorrihiza-specific phosphate transporter gene LePT4 in these cells. The active principle was characterized as the lysolipid lyso-phosphatidylcholine (LPC) via a combination of gene expression studies, alkalinization assyays in cell cultures, and chromatographic and mass spectrometric analyses. Our results highlighht the importance of lysophospholipids as signals in plants and in particular in the AM symbiosis.

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