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How to Accuse the Other Guy of Lying with Statistics

Charles Murray
Statistical Science
Vol. 20, No. 3 (Aug., 2005), pp. 239-241
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20061179
Page Count: 3
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
How to Accuse the Other Guy of Lying with Statistics
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Abstract

We've known how to lie with statistics for 50 years now. What we really need are theory and praxis for accusing someone else of lying with statistics. The author's experience with the response to "The Bell Curve" has led him to suspect that such a formulation already exists, probably imparted during a secret initiation for professors in the social sciences. This article represents his best attempt to reconstruct what must be in it.

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