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Duplicitous Diegesis: "Don Quijote" and Charlie Kaufman's "Adaptation"

Barbara Simerka and Christopher B. Weimer
Hispania
Vol. 88, No. 1 (Mar., 2005), pp. 91-100
DOI: 10.2307/20063079
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20063079
Page Count: 10
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Duplicitous Diegesis: "Don Quijote" and Charlie Kaufman's "Adaptation"
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Abstract

It is our purpose in this essay to offer a comparative study of Cervantes's "Don Quijote" and the 2002 film Adaptation, written by Charlie Kaufman and directed by Spike Jonze. This analysis will center on specific elements fundamental to the two works: the representation of self-inscriptive narrative acts and the juxtaposition of disparate generic forms to create parody. These homologies between Cervantes's novel and Kaufman and Jonze's film, we will argue, provide a striking example of how the aesthetic and epistemological preoccupations central to cultural production in the early modern period, during which the ideological constructs of modernity first appeared as emergent discourses, have returned to manifest themselves anew in popular art forms of the postmodern period which marks those constructs' disintegration.

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