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New Harness Design for Attachment of Radio Transmitters to Small Passerines (Nuevo Diseño de Arnés para Atar Transmisores a Passeriformes Pequeños)

John H. Rappole and Alan R. Tipton
Journal of Field Ornithology
Vol. 62, No. 3 (Summer, 1991), pp. 335-337
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Association of Field Ornithologists
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20065798
Page Count: 3
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
New Harness Design for Attachment of Radio Transmitters to Small Passerines (Nuevo Diseño de Arnés para Atar Transmisores a Passeriformes Pequeños)
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Abstract

Proper attachment of radio transmitters to small passerines is critical to success of telemetry studies. Neck loop and wing loop harnesses pose a number of problems. Gluing techniques are better, but are time consuming. A figure-8 harness that slides on over the legs of the bird, with the transmitter resting over the synsacrum, provides a rapid attachment technique that minimizes problems of balance and physical discomfort. /// El atar correctamente radiotransmisores a Passeriformes de poco tamaño, es crítico en el éxito que se pueda tener en estudios de telemetría. Los arneses de lazos en el pescuezo y las alas presentan una serie de problemas. Las técnicas en las cuales se utiliza pegamento son mucho mejores, pero consumen mucho tiempo. Un arnés en forma de "ocho" que se desliza por sobre las patas del ave, con el transmisor descansado sobre el sacro, provee de una atadura rápida que minimiza problemas de balance y de incomodidad física.

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