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Site Fidelity and Renesting of Female American Pipits (Fidelidad a Localidades y Reanidamiento en Hembras de Anthus rubescens)

Paul Hendricks
Journal of Field Ornithology
Vol. 62, No. 3 (Summer, 1991), pp. 338-342
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Association of Field Ornithologists
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20065799
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Site Fidelity and Renesting of Female American Pipits (Fidelidad a Localidades y Reanidamiento en Hembras de Anthus rubescens)
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Abstract

Nesting biology of American Pipits (Anthus rubescens) was studied on the Beartooth Plateau in northern Wyoming in 1987-1989, with supplemental observations made in 1984. Thirty-two adult female pipits were banded in 1987 and 1988. Return rate of banded females for the first year following banding was 12.5% (4 of 32 females); 1 (6.3%) of 16 females banded in 1987 was also found nesting on the study area in 1989. Nests of returning females were close (<40 m) to their nests of the previous year, or were off the study area. Four cases of within-year renesting were documented. Replacement nests were close (36.8 ± 14.5 m) to original nests, and the first replacement eggs were laid 5.5 ± 1.3 d after original nests were destroyed or abandoned. On average, replacement clutches were as large as original clutches, but mean egg volumes were slightly smaller in replacement clutches. /// La biología de anidamiento de Anthus rubescens se estudió en la localidad de Beartooth Plateau, al norte de Wyoming. El estudio se llevó a cabo de 1987-1989 con observaciones suplementarias en el 1984. Se anillaron 32 hembras adultas en 1987 y 1988. La tasa de retorno de hembras anilladas para el primer año fue de 12.5% (4 de 32); el 6.3% (1/16) de las hembras anilladas en el 1987 también regresaron al área de estudio a reproducirse. Los nidos de estas hembras, se encontraron tanto cerca (<40 m) de sus nidos del año anterior, como fuera del área de estudio. Cuatro casos de reanidamiento fueron documentados al año siguiente. Ocurrió remplazo de camadas 5.5 ± 1.3 d luego de que el nido original fuera destruido o abandonado. Las camadas de remplazo fueron, en promedio, tan grandes como las camadas originales, pero el volumen promedio de los huevos en éstas, fue un poco menor.

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