Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

From Illusory 'Society' to Intellectual 'Public': VOKS, International Travel and Party: Intelligentsia Relations in the Interwar Period

Michael David-Fox
Contemporary European History
Vol. 11, No. 1, Special Issue: Patronage, Personal Networks and the Party-State: Everyday Life in the Cultural Sphere in Communist Russia and East Central Europe (Feb., 2002), pp. 7-32
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20081815
Page Count: 26
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
From Illusory 'Society' to Intellectual 'Public': VOKS, International Travel and Party: Intelligentsia Relations in the Interwar Period
Preview not available

Abstract

This article examines the emergence of the Soviet regulation of foreign travel in a specific context: the space in which Soviet international aspirations overlapped and interacted with Party-intelligentsia relations at home. The discussion ties together two major, international aspects of Party-intelligentsia relations. The first is a detailed discussion of the regulation of foreign travel, exploring the manner in which access to the outside world in the early Soviet years was, like other scarce or highly sought-after resources, subject to bureaucratic monopolisation and, as a result, became not only subject to party-state regulatory agendas but also a prime staple of patronage transactions. The second is an examination of how the emergence of Soviet cultural diplomacy in the 1920s began to influence Soviet domestic interactions with the non-party intelligentsia. Specifically, the article examines the particular way in which the intelligentsia was enlisted in foreign cultural relations by the All-Union Society for Cultural Ties Abroad (VOKS). The article shows the policies and attitudes behind the creation of VOKS as an ostensibly non-governmental association and dissects the many aspects of its intricate engagement with the non-Party, intellectual public known by the Russian term obshchestvennost'. The analysis suggests that the widespread assumption that personal and bureaucratic relations are dichotomous or fully separable ignores the way in which institutional agendas and personal connections were routinely intertwined in Soviet patronage. Furthermore, key stages in the Soviet handling of the intelligentsia's access to international contacts, from the New Economic Policy to Stalin's 'Great Break' to the Great Purges, were fundamentally shaped by the intense ideological and cultural significance invested in the foreign cultural resources as they were transformed from prized assets to fatal sources of contagion. /// Cet article examine l'émergence de la régulation des voyages internationaux culturels par les autorités soviétiques. On effectue tout d'abord une présentation détaillée de la réglementation des voyages internationaux et de l'accès au monde extérieur, en tant que denrée rare contrôlée par la bureaucratie, terrain privilégié de l'expression des rapports officiels de pouvoir tout autant qu'enjeu des relations de patronage. Puis on scrute la manière dont l'émergence d'une diplomatie culturelle soviétique dans les années 1920 modifia les relations domestiques entre le pouvoir et l'intelligentsia 'hors-Parti'. L'article utilise le VOKS (Société pour les liens culturels avec l'étranger) pour questionner ces deux dimensions internationales de la relation entre parti et intelligentsia. Il peut ainsi suggérer que les réseaux bureaucratiques et politiques s'intriquaient avec les relations personnelles jusque dans la routine du patronage. Il souligne aussi combien les étapes clés dans le contrôle de la relation de l'intelligentsia soviétique avec les ressources culturelles étrangères furent liées à l'importance et aux modifications des significations qui furent prêtées à l'accès à l'étranger, tour à tour atout indispensable ou source de contagion. /// Der Aufsatz untersucht die Entstehung der sowjetischen Regulierungen von Auslandreisen in einem bestimmten Zusammenhang: im Überschneidungsbereich zwischen internationalen Ambitionen und Beziehungen innerhalb der heimischen Parteiintelligenz. Zuerst wird detailliert erörtert, wie die Reiseerlaubnis in der frühen Sowjetzeit wie andere knappe Ressourcen bürokratischen monopolisiert wurde und damit nicht nur parteistaatlichen Absichten unterworfen, sondern zugleich zu einem Hauptgut im Patronagesystem wurde. Danach untersucht der Aufsatz, wie die Entstehung einer sowjetischen Kulturdiplomatie in den zwanziger Jahren sich auf das innere Verhältnis zur nicht der Partei angehörenden Intelligenz auswirkte, indem die Intellektuellen durch die All-Unions Gesellschaft für Kulturelle Beziehungen zum Ausland (VOKS) eingebunden wurden. Die politischen Absichten und Haltungen hinter der Gründung der VOKS als scheinbar nichtregierungsamtliche Vereinigung werden erläutert. So kann gezeigt werden, dass persönliche und bürokratische Beziehungen keineswegs dichotomisch, sondern engstens mit der sowjetischen Patronage verbunden waren. Die ideologische und kulturelle Bedeutung, die den Auslandsreisen beigemessen wurden, wirkte sich jeweils auf die Hauptphasen der Regulierung von Auslandskontakten aus, die sich von wertvollen Gütern zu infektiösen Kontakten wandelten.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[7]
    [7]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9
  • Thumbnail: Page 
10
    10
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11
    11
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12
    12
  • Thumbnail: Page 
13
    13
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14
    14
  • Thumbnail: Page 
15
    15
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16
    16
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17
    17
  • Thumbnail: Page 
18
    18
  • Thumbnail: Page 
19
    19
  • Thumbnail: Page 
20
    20
  • Thumbnail: Page 
21
    21
  • Thumbnail: Page 
22
    22
  • Thumbnail: Page 
23
    23
  • Thumbnail: Page 
24
    24
  • Thumbnail: Page 
25
    25
  • Thumbnail: Page 
26
    26
  • Thumbnail: Page 
27
    27
  • Thumbnail: Page 
28
    28
  • Thumbnail: Page 
29
    29
  • Thumbnail: Page 
30
    30
  • Thumbnail: Page 
31
    31
  • Thumbnail: Page 
32
    32